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Do we really believe in impermanence?

In my own practice, I’ve really been wrestling with the Buddha’s teaching of anicca—the truth that all conditioned, fabricated, created things are impermanent and constantly change. It’s one thing to accept anicca as a truism—after all, it’s obvious that all things change and are transient. And it’s another to see something of the truth of […]

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How to accept our faults without falling into self-condemnation or inaction

Here are some more great teachings from Buddhist teacher Ayya Khema. If you, like me, often have to deal with self-condemnation and self-hatred because of continual personal failings, this article should be a big help in balancing seeing what needs to change in us and accepting everything in us without self-condemnation. Accepting Oneself Ayya Khema […]

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Breaking habits of perception-a skill that changes everything

Here is another great teaching from Thanissaro Bhikkhu.  While looking for some buddhadharma about dealing with guilt about the past, I came across this paragraph, from the end of his article, “Habits of Perception.”  It was so helpful, I stopped my search to  read the whole article, which I share below.  May it be an […]

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Why Loving-kindness Doesn’t Have to Be Lovey-dovey

One of my favorite things each day is getting my daily e-mail for Tricyle Magazine. There’s always an inspiring dharma teaching or quotation from an article at the website that I almost always want to go and read. Given that this blog is all about metta practice, and since Gil Fronsdal is a teacher I’ve […]

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The Dhammapada – Audio Dharma by Gil Fronsdal

The Dhammapada is a great treasure of the Buddhadharma and beloved by Buddhists of all traditions as well as many non-Buddhists. There are many wonderful translations of the Dhammapada from its original Pali, but one of my favorites is the fairly recent translation by Gil Fronsdal: The Dhammapada: A New Translation of the Buddhist Classic […]

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The Dhammapada-Verses That Bring Peace and Wisdom

The Dhammapada comes from the earliest period of Buddhism in India and is loved by Buddhists of all traditions. These teachings, originally put in verse form for easy memorization for those who could not read, expound many of the philosophical and practical foundations of the Buddha’s teaching. Every day I open up one of my […]

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Transforming the Three Poisons: Greed, Hatred, and Delusion

Today post is a study of the Buddha’s treatment of what the Buddha defined as the three major hindrances to happiness and freedom from suffering. These three hindrances have been variously called the Three Poisons or Three Stains. They are usually identified as greed (or hungry grasping), aversion (ill will or hatred), and delusion.  These […]

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The End of Suffering-The Light at the End of the Tunnel

This is the third in a series of articles sharing  insights of some spiritual thinkers on the First Noble Truth, the truth of suffering. The first article shared insights from Ken Wilber and can be read here: Dissatisfaction with Life—the Start of Discovery The second shared insights from Daniel Ingram and can be read here: […]

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Dealing with Suffering *is* Spiritual Practice

This is the second in a three-part series of articles sharing the insights of some spiritual thinkers on the subject of suffering and the First Noble Truth. In the first article, I shared insights from Ken Wilber’s No Boundary. You can read the post here: Dissatisfaction with Life-the Start of Discovery This excerpt in this […]

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The Buddha on Not Chasing the Past or Placing Expectations on the Future

The Blessed One said: One would not chase after the past,
 or place expectations on the future. What is past
 is left behind.
 The future 
is as yet un-reached. Whatever quality is present 
one clearly sees right there,
 right there. Unvanquished, unshaken, 
that’s how one develops the mind. Ardently doing one’s duty today,
 for — who knows? — […]

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